PII

3 ways to redact a document

3 ways to redact a document

Ensure all sensitive information in the document has been removed. 

The exclusion of private information from sensitive documents is something that individuals in different fields and job roles need to worry about. From the single business proprietor who needs to redact personal or business financial information to government agencies protecting policy data, redacting sensitive information properly is key. For those who need to redact a document the right way, some basic steps based on expert advice can come in handy.

All of the data you need, none of the data you don’t

All of the data you need, none of the data you don’t

Introduce automated redaction to your workflows

We live in a world of instant gratification and immediate satisfaction which leads to companies wanting to speed up workflow processes to get higher quality work done, quicker. There are companies where their entire business plan is about how they can make other organization’s workflow more efficient, accurate, and up to do with the world around them.

Don't get caught with PII being under-protected

Don't get caught with PII being under-protected

Government Data breaches

Data breaches and data leaks have been far more common over the past few years than people know, especially within government. Governments are becoming commonly known for their data breaches throughout the years because they have been focused on making private information public in a timely fashion, but they have been relying on the manual redaction process, and too often personally identifiable information (PII) gets missed.

The Risks of Manual Redaction

The Risks of Manual Redaction

Protecting sensitive information through redaction is gaining priority across all organizations. With regulations tightening and the growing need to publish reports online, there is more data requiring redaction. Search engines can even find information that is hidden from our eyes, requiring more attention to redacting private data. Manually identifying this sensitive information is a huge undertaking. This time-consuming task is costly with a margin of error too large for comfort.

The Cold Hard Truth About Private Information

The Cold Hard Truth About Private Information

We are all in an arms race.  Every time you strengthen your data defenses the thieves think of new ways to penetrate them.  One of the best defenses is a strong common sense.

Don’t use your personal information (or your client’s information) if you don’t have to.  And don’t store/save it if you don’t need to.  If the data isn’t out “there”, it can’t be stolen.

Redaction Software Helps Walk Access & Privacy Tightrope: Part 2

Redaction Software Helps Walk Access & Privacy Tightrope: Part 2

The main factor in Florida’s delay results from the Florida Supreme Court being cautious. The Court made it a priority to ensure confidential information contained in court files does not get disclosed to those not entitled to see it. In this article, I focus on the rules of procedure the Court passed to limit what does get into the court file. One of the first steps taken by the court was to identify the types of documents filed with the court that filers and court personnel must recognize high a high probability of containing confidential information.

Redaction Software Helps Walk Access & Privacy Tightrope: Part 1

Redaction Software Helps Walk Access & Privacy Tightrope: Part 1

Courts face this challenge daily - how do you put documents online and not violate the privacy of litigants? It’s no easy task. Court files are a literal treasure trove of private information. The Florida court system has struggled with this issue for a long time. Florida is somewhat unique in that it has two competing provisions in its constitution. The problem is not limited to Florida. Every court faces the same issues. This is the first of five blog posts setting forth lessons learned from Florida’s almost fifteen-year experience putting documents online. Later articles in the series include recommended best practices using policy and technology tools such as intelligent redaction software to balance privacy and access.

How Much Sensitive Data is in Your Records?

How Much Sensitive Data is in Your Records?

When making a business case for automated redaction software it's important to look at how much sensitive data needs to be redacted. Using a hunt-and-redact approach might appear workable in a low volume setting, but understanding how much sensitive data actually exists could reveal a significant cost savings for your organization. There are two key factors to understanding how much sensitive data you are dealing with: the percentage of documents that contain sensitive information and the amount of sensitive information in those documents. Knowing the percentage of documents that need to be processed with redaction[automated redaction software] software is the first step in understanding whether or not an automated redaction solution is right for you.When making a business case for automated redaction software it's important to look at how much sensitive data needs to be redacted. Using a hunt-and-redact approach might appear workable in a low volume setting, but understanding how much sensitive data actually exists could reveal a significant cost savings for your organization. There are two key factors to understanding how much sensitive data you are dealing with: the percentage of documents that contain sensitive information and the amount of sensitive information in those documents. Knowing the percentage of documents that need to be processed with redaction[automated redaction software] software is the first step in understanding whether or not an automated redaction solution is right for you.

The Age of Automated Redaction

The Age of Automated Redaction

If you have lived on this earth for more than a couple of decades, you do not have to look back very far to realize all of the conveniences technology has brought to our everyday lives. When it comes to the subject of online court records however, technology it seems has made things much more complicated. Gone are the days of “practical obscurity” when a trip to the courthouse to view a paper file inherently limited access to information and court staff had control over who was looking at records and for what purpose.  

NCSC + HackerNest = CourtHack Hackathon

NCSC + HackerNest = CourtHack Hackathon

I attended my fifth Court Technology Conference (CTC) in Minneapolis, MN this past week. The educational track that resonated with me was How IT Can Design and Deliver Solutions to Create a High Performance Court. Here is a quote from the session description that really sums up the state of technology in the courts: